Former NSA contractor, turned whistleblower, facing extradition

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edwardHONG KONG, CHINA – What do you do when you’re the most wanted man in the world? That’s what Edward Snowden is trying to figure out.

Snowden is the ex-contractor for the National Security Agency, turned whistleblower, who leaked top secret documents about U.S. surveillance programs. He fled the U.S. after the leak, and reportedly wants to seek asylum in a country with shared values — aka somewhere where they won’t fry his butt!

He was in Hong Kong, but is rumored to be on the move because he could be facing extradition.

When and if the Justice Department charges him, it would be up to the International Criminal Police Organization to try and get him extradited to the U.S. But even then, Snowden could request a judicial review, and the decision to extradite him could be appealed.

Sure the whole judicial system can be confusing, especially in another country, but if there’s one thing we know: the whole process can be really slow.

Russia is joining in on the chatter, too. They’ve reportedly said they could consider granting asylum to Snowden if he requests it.

Someone not chiming in on Snowden’s side is Booz Allen, the company he worked for. They fired him and released a statement, saying Snowden was an employee of theirs for less than three months, and that they were shocked one of their employee’s was the leaker.

Booz Allen also says Snowden was only paid $122,000 a year, not the $200,000 Snowden said he supposedly made