Razorback backlash to Arkansas religious freedom law extends to governor’s family

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LITTLE ROCK, AR – There’s some razorback backlash to what may be the nation’s next religious freedom restoration law in Arkansas.

Governor Asa Hutchinson says he stands by the concept of the bill, but is asking the legislature to amend it so that it more closely mirrors the Federal Religious Freedom Restoration Act signed into law in 1993 by President Bill Clinton, who was governor of Arkansas before becoming president.

Hutchison said the issue has become divisive because the nation is split on how to balance cultural diversity with religious convictions. "It has divided families and there is clearly a generational gap on this issue. My son Seth signed the petition asking me, Dad, the governor, to veto this bill.”

Indiana lawmakers and the governor continue to feel the heat from individuals and corporations after enacting their version.

That law expands on the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby ruling that “closely held” corporations can act on religious beliefs by including all corporations and associations.

The inclusion of those public corporations and associations is what has opponents, both individual and corporate, hopping mad.

And while corporations and organizations are opposing the law or boycotting the state, such as Dow Chemical, NASCAR, Indiana pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly and Indiana University’s statewide healthcare system, some small businesses, the backbone of any state’s economy, are going so far as to put up signs in store windows, showing that all people, and their money, are always welcome.

Except in one pizza joint in Walkerton, Indiana which is near the Michigan border.

"If a gay couple was to come in and they wanted us to provide them pizzas for a wedding, we would have to say no,” said Crystal O’Connor of Memories Pizza.

After those comments, they probably don’t have to worry about that ever happening.