U.S. acceptance of LGBT community lower than expected

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HOUSTON, TX-- When gay marriage was given the Supreme Court's stamp of approval last year, a lot of folks thought the battle was over, that everyone was equal.

Then came the HERO vote here in Houston, and questions started to pop up. Now a new Harris Poll proves we as a society might not be as accepting of the LGBT community as we'd like to think we are.

Out of 2000 people polled from across the country, 30% of the straight folks said they are 'uncomfortable' seeing same-sex couple holding hands. They would also be uncomfortable if their child's teacher was LGBT.

"Thirty years ago, people were uncomfortable with black and white people holding hands. Quite frankly, people are still uncomfortable with that today," explains Fran Watson, the new president of the GLBT Houston Political Caucus. "However, we know that folks in general believe in equality and believe that love is love and that people should be able to just be who they are in loving relationships."

Today, young gays, lesbians and bisexuals are four times more likely to attempt suicide than their straight peers. It's worse with transgender youth.  And yet, 36% of straight poll respondents in the Harris Poll said social acceptance of these groups was not a serious problem.

Many straights polled actually thought gays had more rights than they themselves did. Watson disagrees, "We have marriage equality, but you can get married on Friday legally and you can fired Monday when you set that picture down of your spouse. That's not gonna happen with a heterosexual couple."

So will we ever see a day where we are all truly equal? "As long as we all come together and continue fighting for this, then we can achieve equality," says Watson. "I didn't think marriage would happen in my lifetime, so we'll see. I'm hopeful."

So are we!