Houston Muslims call for more police support as terror attacks reign worldwide

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MEDINA, SAUDI ARABIA-- As America celebrates its independence, it seems the bad guys want to keep us shaking in our boots.

At least 200 people were killed in Baghdad Saturday when suicide bombers drove a refrigerator truck full of explosives into the center of Karrada. A second bomb exploded north of the capital. Some bodies were so badly burned, they will have to be identified by DNA.

This, just hours after seven gunmen in Bangladesh raided a Dhaka cafe, killing two police officers and slitting the throats of 20 hostages. Among the dead: students from UC Berkeley and Emory University.

Shama Hussain witnessed that attack.

"I think we are seeing a rise in radicalism in this country. And it's really scary that these attacks have been so consistent," Hussain said.

Then early Monday in Saudi Arabia, the first of three suicide bombers struck. One at the U.S. Consulate, one by a Shiite mosque and the deadliest in Medina, where the Prophet Muhammad is buried. There, four people were killed and another injured.

All this is happening as the holy month of Ramadan winds down.

Of course, Donald Trump couldn't resist turning these tragedies into political maneuvers, tweeting, "The third mass attack (slaughter) in days by ISIS... we do not have leadership that can stop this!"

In Houston, a Muslim optometrist, Dr. Arsalan Tajammul, was beaten up and shot early Sunday outside the Madrasah Islamiah mosque. Police suspect that incident may have been a robbery rather than a hate crime.

But the Muslim community is not taking any chances.

"We urge local community leaders," said Mustafaa Carroll with the Houston chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, "to institute additional security measures in wake of a number of hate incidents across the country."

"A friend of mine who's an imam (mosque prayer leader) in Seattle, somebody shot at their mosque," said Shaykh Waleed Basyouni, imam of the Clear Lake Islamic Center. "Another friend of mine in Dallas, somebody shot a their mosque. Another friend of mine in Orange County, somebody dropped a burned Qur'an in front of their mosque."

Community activist Deric Muhammad says enough is enough.

"It makes for a climate in this country that I don't think is synonymous with the independence and the freedom that we claim that we're supposed to be celebrating today," he said.

Ramadan ends Tuesday or Wednesday, depending on the moon. We can only hope all this hate and violence toward Muslims ends with it.