Freddie Gray case: Charges dropped against remaining officers

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Baltimore, MD — All remaining charges have been dropped against the Baltimore cops in the Freddie Gray case, according to an announcement Wednesday from the state's attorney.

"I have decided not to proceed on the cases against Officer Garrett, Sergeant Alicia White or to re-litigate the case against William Porter," Baltimore City State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby said.

After three officers were acquitted, Mosby decided it's time to give it up.

"Without real substantive reforms to the current criminal justice system, we could try this case one hundred times — and cases just like it — and we would still end up with the same result," Mosby said. "Police investigating police — whether they're friends or mainly they're colleagues — was problematic."

Prosecutor: 'Inherent bias when police police themselves'

Mosby said there were individual police officers that were witnesses to the case, yet were part of the investigative team.

“[There were also] interrogations that were conducted without asking the most poignant questions, lead detectives that were completely uncooperative and started a counter-investigation to disprove the state's case,” she said.

Mosby, who comes from a long line of police officers, told reporters she isn't anti-police.

"I'm anti-police-brutality. And I need not remind you that the only loss — and the greatest loss — in all of this was that of Freddie Gray's life," she said.

When Mosby first took on Gray's case, some praised how swiftly she acted. Others, however, said there wasn't enough evidence to convict the officers.

Mosby herself has taken a lot of heat from critics who say she 'over-charged' the officers from the start.

"We have probable cause to file criminal charges," she first announced in 2015.

"The detectives assigned to the case conducted a very thorough investigation into the tragic death of Freddie Gray, but the state's attorney simply could not accept the evidence," Baltimore Fraternal Order of Police President Gene Ryan said. "She had her own agenda."

An online posting called the decision to drop charges "evil."

Donald Trump has an opinion about the drama as well.

"I think she ought to prosecute herself — that's my reaction," Trump told reporters. "I think it was disgraceful."

But Gray's stepfather —Richard Shipley — applauds Mosby.

"We stand behind Marilyn and her prosecuting team," Shipley said. "And my family is proud to have them represent us."

Gray died from a neck injury he received while in police custody.

Gray's death led to days of protests in Baltimore against police brutality.

Mosby said she still agrees with the medical examiner's finding that Gray's death was a homicide.

Van ride was key part of investigation

Gray died a week after police stopped him on a Baltimore street.

During his arrest, officers placed Gray in the back of a police van, which made several stops.

By the time the van arrived at the police station, Gray was unresponsive.

His neck was broken and compressed, prosecutors said in court, comparing the spinal injury to those suffered after a dive into a shallow pool.

New trial had been set to start

A pretrial hearing for Officer Garrett Miller had been set for Wednesday. Trials for Officers Alicia White and William Porter had been scheduled for the fall.

Baltimore Chief Deputy State's Attorney Michael Schatzow made the request to drop charges against them in court Wednesday.

Three officers were previously acquitted in the case: Edward Nero, a bike officer involved in the initial police encounter with Gray; Caesar Goodson, who drove the van that transported Gray; and Lt. Brian Rice, the highest-ranking officer charged.

A retrial against Porter had been scheduled after a jury deadlocked in the case against him in December.