High School Scorecard

Katy woman’s Facebook video helps reunite lost elderly man with family

KATY, Texas — Tuesday is National Night Out, a chance to meet the officers working to keep you safe and those living right next door.

"We cannot keep our communities safe," the Houston Police Department's acting chief Martha Montalvo said, "without the help of the people who live in those communities."

Nobody embodies that more than Katy mom Kelly Mayes-Holmes. She drove home Monday to find a disoriented, elderly man in her street. Instead of avoiding him (like so many folks would), she tries talking to him, but he doesn't speak English. So she calls 911 and logs onto Facebook Live, hoping to find his family.

In her nearly three-minute video, she explains, "I don't know where he lives, and I'm not comfortable leaving him outside. It's pretty warm outside.... He didn't have a wallet or any type of identification, so if you could help, that would be greatly appreciated."

"He has a home," she explains to NewsFix, "You can tell he has a home. He just needed to get back to it."

Within a few hours, Kelly's video is seen by 17,000 people. (As of this writing, it's been seen by more than 54,000).

"This is what social media is for," the Morton Ranch resident says. "It's to get the word out. It's to spread it quickly."

But nobody comes knocking on her door, so the lost man stays with Mayes-Holmes for three hours until the Harris County Sheriff's Department arrives. They tell her a man called their station, scared to death he'd lost his father.

But Kelly still wasn't done with her new friend. "He did not want to get into the sheriff's vehicle... and I kinda didn't want him to get in there either," she explains. "So I put him inside (my) car, put the seatbelt on him and we just followed the deputy over to his home and his son was waiting there with open arms."

Folks online have called Kelly "a living angel" and said things like, "In the climate of hate and distrust the nation has sunk to, your heart shines large."

"It makes me feel good," she says. "It makes me feel that my grandmother who raised me did an amazing job. You do unto others as you would want done to you."

Funny thing about all this: Kelly never got her new friend's name. "Hopefully, I can get in touch with him, so we can have more quality time together," she says. "I'll walk with him. If that's what he likes to do, hey, I can spare 30, 40 minutes a day to walk with this gentleman, just to get him out and about."

People helping people-- that's what National Night Out is all about. And really, what every day should be about.