The HPV Vaccine is said to prevent cancer- so why don’t some people like it?

Wouldn’t it be great to have a vaccine to prevent cancer? Well, maybe we’ve had one for the past 10 years.

The human papilloma virus, or HPV, affects at least 50 percent of sexually active people, and while often, it will just kind of go away on its own- studies show that certain strains can be the direct cause of a few nasty forms of cancer.

“We know vaccine works, and it’s safe. This is the best public health invention that we have achieved in history.” Expressed Essi Havor, the Chief Nurse of the Houston Health Department.

Many doctors and scientists agree that it’s best to vax to your kids for HPV before turning 13, But some parents refuse the treatment believing that the STD vaccine’s perceived potential risks, such as permanent neurological damage and other serious side effects, outweigh the benefits.

The Anti-Vax camp of thought believes the medical companies are putting profit over people and pay the scientists running the studies to give results that will sell more product.

“What I would say to an individual that has questions about vaccine is: (first), do your research. Every parent wants to be sure they’re making the proper decision. The proper decision is vaccine.” Stated Latosha Hinckson Callis, the administration manager of the Houston Health Department. She continued,

“We know they have eradicated polio in the United States. That’s the success of vaccine.”

The HPV Vaccination comes as a three-dose package spread out over about an eighth  month period of time And although it’s suggested for children to complete the three dosages by 13, the vaccine can still be effective for at risk men up to 21 and at risk women up to 26.

If still you “needle little help” deciding what to do- the Houston Department of Health and Human Services has this to say:

“Vaccines are so important. They’re so valuable. When we get something to protect ourselves- in essence what we’re doing is protecting the community.” Exclaimed Callis.