Tobacco usage linked to 40% of all cancers in US

ATLANTA — Almost everyone knows tobacco can cause cancer— but did you know just how much cancer it can cause?

As it turns out, tobacco is responsible for nearly half of all cancer diagnosis in the nation, according to a new report from the Center for Disease Control.  An estimated 40 percent of all cancer cases in the United States can be linked to tobacco usage.

And it's not just lung cancer.

The CDC reports tobacco can cause cancers of the mouth and throat, the voice box, esophagus, stomach, kidney, pancreas, liver, bladder, cervix, colon and rectum, and a even a type of leukemia.

Around 343,000 people died from cancer each year between 2009 and 2013, the report said. Researchers said smoking is the main cause, and kicking the habit is the key to reducing cancer risk.

There are nearly 36 million smokers in the county, and because smoking changes a person's DNA, some suffer from permanent brain damage. The research also revealed smoking is just four to five packs of cigarettes in your lifetime can cause permanent cell mutations in your lungs— that look kind of like scars.

However, doctors said there are a lot of thing that can revert back when you quit smoking, so there's still a good reason to quit.

About 1.3 million lives have been saved as smoking rates have continued to drop since 1990, the CDC reports.

It's simple. If you want to bring down your chances of getting cancer, then you should stop lighting up!