Bone-sniffing dogs embark on expedition to locate remains of Amelia Earhart

LOS ANGELES, Cali. - Whatever happened to the legendary aviator-- Amelia Earhart?

Well, it's an 80-year-old mystery that "Man's Best Friend" now hopes to solve!

"We train on old bones and old teeth, and our dogs are trained to find historic and pre-historic human remains," Lynne Engelbert of the Institute for Canine Forensics explained.

Four specially-trained, bone-sniffing dogs are on their way to embark on an adventure of a lifetime....all in hopes of digging up the remains of the aviation icon.

"This is one of the tools that hasn't been used," Engelbert added.

The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery is backing the expedition to a remote island in the South Pacific where Earhart may have wound up.

The famed female aviator vanished after taking off from New Guinea on on July 2, 1937 in her bid to become the first woman to fly around the world.

Some believe her plane crashed over the Pacific Ocean, but no wreckage or remains have ever been found.

That's why some think Earhart made it safely to an uninhabited island near Fiji-- Nikumaroro Island-- where she lived out the rest of her days.

And now the canine forensics team is taking a 13-hour flight to Fiji, then sailing on a 1,000-mile voyage to reach the tiny island.

"And then we're going to be dealing with a coral atoll," Engelbert described. "We're going to be dealing with heat and humidity."

Still, they say it's all worth it.

"If we can help....to me, it's bringing her home to her family," Engelbert said.

Perhaps...at last, one of the great mysteries of the 20th century will finally be solved!