China is trying to convince North Korea to stay calm after latest UN sanctions

MANILA, Philippines —If countries were students, North Korea would be the bully always being sent to the principal's office.  But one cannot compare trouble on a playground  to a global nuclear threat.

On Saturday, the United Nations put North Korea in detention, imposing the harshest sanctions against the country to date.

While meeting in the Philippines, the UN Security Council voted unanimously against North Korea exporting coal, iron, seafood and all its other main sources of revenue. These sanctions could cost the country up to $1 billion dollars per year.

The purpose of these sanctions is to punish Kim Jong Un's regime for developing and launching missiles, which could reach the United States and Japan.

The only country, who spoke directly with North Korean leaders is their neighbor, China. Chinese foreign minister, Wang Yi, met with North Korean foreign minister, Ri Yong Ho. He says China is urging the DPRK to be smart and stop provoking other countries.

Wang had some strong words for the North Korean diplomat, telling him to cut out the tests and follow the sanctions. The Chinese foreign minister also thinks the U.S. and Japan should stop "escalating tensions."

On this side of the pond, President Donald Trump tweeted his support for the sanctions.

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley says she hopes North Korea chooses a peaceful route. "The ball is in North Korea's court. They have to decide where they want to go from here" says Haley.

Only time will tell if China's conversations with North Korea will help them stop ticking off the international community.