Trump targets North Korea, Iran in UN speech, while former Trump Campaign manager was reportedly ‘wiretapped’

NEW YORK CITY - It was an all-world event Tuesday as President Donald Trump took center stage at the United Nations.

"In America, we do not seek to impose our way of life on anyone, but rather to let it shine as an example for everyone to watch," Trump declared.

With world leaders and the U.S. delegation watching, the president touched on many familiar themes, but was especially direct in his warning to North Korea.

"The United States has great strength and patience, but if it is forced to defend itself or its allies, we will have no choice but to totally destroy North Korea," the president warned.

The president even called North Korean leader Kim Jun Un by his new Trump nickname: 'Rocket man.'

"Rocket man is on a suicide mission for himself and for his regime," Trump insisted.

And the Prez didn't mince words when it came to the Iran Nuclear Agreement, either.

"Frankly, that deal is an embarrassment to the United States, and I don't think you've heard the last of it. Believe me," Trump suggested.

The reaction to Trump's speech was mixed.

Former U.N. Ambassador John Bolton called it 'the best speech of his presidency.'

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu tweeted...."In over 30 years in my experience with the UN, I never heard a bolder or more courageous speech."

But Venezuela's Foreign Minister accused America of violating human rights all over the world and blasted Trump for addressing other countries as if they were his 'employees.'

"It's a president who comes for the first time and speaks about war, about destroying countries, about blockades against countries," Jorge Arreaza, Foreign Affairs Minister of Venezuela, said.

But longtime Trump critic-- Mitt Romney-- tweeted, "President Trump gave a strong and needed challenge to UN members to live up to its charter and to confront global challenges."

Meanwhile, a major revelation in the Russia investigation: former Trump Campaign manager-- Paul Manafort--  was reportedly wire-tapped by U.S. investigators under secret court order, dating back to 2014, before Trump even announced his candidacy.

The spying was stopped at one point last year due to lack of evidence, but started up again with suspicions Manafort had encouraged Russians to help with the 2016 campaign, according to reports.

But at least two sources say evidence of collusion is 'inconclusive.'

Between Manafort and Trump, the eyes of the world are watching.