Marriage problems causes health issues in men, new study finds

HOUSTON-- A new study published in the BMJ's Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health reveals that marriage troubles often lead to more health problems for men.

"There's no question that there's been data for many years that in people who are depressed or anxious, that they're more susceptible to immunologic disorders and certain cardiovascular disorders," psychologist Dr. George Santos said.

Researchers from The University of Bristol and The University of Glasgow said the ups and downs of an unstable relationships can often cause high blood pressure, bad cholesterol and weight gain.

They tracked changes in cardiovascular risk factors of 620 married fathers in the UK from 1991 to 2013.

These love-locked men had to rate the quality of their relationship, ranging from consistently good, consistently bad to improving or deteriorating.

The study showed that men with deteriorating relationships had worsening blood pressure along with other health risks.

However, when things with the Mrs. were all good, men saw their health improve. They lost weight, bad cholesterol dropped and so did their high blood pressure.

So what does the doctor recommend; living a healthier lifestyle or fixing the marital problems?

"Both of these go hand in hand. They need to do things together as a couple and work on that relationship. It can't just be work, home and bed. They've got to be able to go out and do things as a couple. If they find that they're having stress and arguing, and not really enjoying company; they're not doing the things that they got married for -- that's the time to take action and see a therapist," Dr. Santos said.