Governor Perry: Texas will not follow Prison Rape Elimination Act

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AUSTIN, TX – It’s a rape debate and Governor Rick Perry is the one sounding the horn.

If you’re wondering what the heck we’re talking about, it all surrounds the Prison Rape Elimination Act or PREA.

It was signed into law by George W. Bush in 2003 and is aimed at preventing sexual attacks in prisons. Whether it’s rape involving inmates or correction officers, or even those officers witnessing a rape and not reporting it.

So if Bush was on board you’d think Perry would be too; but that’s far from the case.

In fact, Perry has ordered Texas prisons not to follow law.

Wait, can he even do that?

In a letter to Attorney General Eric Holder, Perry explains that Texas can’t afford to¬† implement PREA.

He wrote: “Washington has taken an opportunity to help address a problem in our prisons and jails, but instead created a counterproductive and unnecessarily cumbersome regulatory mess for the states.”

He also went on to say, “I will not sign your form and i will encourage my fellow governors to follow suit.’

Perry is also fired up about the law mandating inmates 17 years and younger to be separated from adults.

Perry’s like — throw them all in together.

His reasoning:

  1. Don’t tell Texas what to do and
  2. Staffing ratios for juvenile detention facilities are too high.

So what happens next? Perry wrote in his letter: “Texas will continue the programs it has already implemented to reduce prison rapes.”

Failure to follow federal law could result in criminal penalties.

Officials from the justice department are expected to meet with Texas officials to discuss the problem, hoping to put an end to this rape debate.