How close did the Nazis get to U.S. soil during WWII?

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Screen Shot 2014-07-15 at 4.04.48 PMGULFPORT, MS – If you were impressed with how much time the Germans spent inside enemy territory during the World Cup, you should see how close they got to Houston during the World War. If you’re like most folks, you probably had no idea German u-boats made it far enough into the Gulf of Mexico during World War Two that Nazi Captains could actually see the lights of Galveston when they emerged to charge their batteries at night. And if you still don’t believe it, there’s this: the remains of U-166, sunken by the Coast Guard in 1942 only 120 miles south of Gulfport, Mississippi.

“Everybody knows the large aspects of World War Two,” says Michael Brennan, director of Marine Archeology of the Ocean Exploration Trust, “but this is one of the unknown frontiers of World War Two and it’ll be great to get that story out to the public to teach them the hidden history of what happened back in the 1940’s.”

Researchers discovered the shipwreck back in the 80’s but now archeologists and film-makers have returned to the site to produce a documentary about Hitler’s underwater campaign just a few miles away from our own back doors, a campaign most Americans never knew about because our government didn’t tell us. “There was no danger to American cities,” Brennan says, “so I think they kept it quiet because there was no reason to cause a panic for the general public.”

It’s enough to make you wonder what they’re keeping from us today.