Domestic violence among female athletes: when the double standard also hurts

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HOUSTON, TX - If you and your fiancé get arrested for alleged domestic violence just a few days before your wedding, then that's not a good sign.

WNBA Phoenix Mercury star and Houston native Brittney Griner and her fiancé, Tulsa Shock player Glory Johnson, were arrested in their Phoenix-area home last week after police received a phone call saying the two were fighting and throwing things at each other.   Believe it or not, after being released the women tweeted that their wedding is still on.

"It's typical for the cycle of violence," said Alelia Watson, licensed professional counselor at LiaSon Counseling Services.  "First there's the abusive phase, then the honeymoon stage and then it starts all over again."

On one hand, the incident has shed light on the problem of violence among LGBT couples.  On the other hand, after all of the much-publicized cases of assault involving professional male athletes, can we expect the same level of public outrage when the aggressor is a woman?

"Just because it's a female, doesn't mean that the actions are okay," explained Watson.  "It seems as if society views females as very meek and fragile.  They don't really view them as ever being aggressors or abusers."

The WNBA says it is looking into the incident.  In the meantime, Griner and Johnson announced they're going to seek counseling to deal with their problems.  That's good because before you say "I do", it's best to know what you're saying "I do" to.

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