Does Superman’s Krypton really exist out in space?

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HOUSTON, TX-- Can DC comics ever match the awesome of Marvel's superhero movies? "Batman vs Superman: Dawn of Justice" raked in more than $420 million worldwide last weekend, but some fans were disappointed.

"I felt like it was underwhelming," said Steve Arias, a self-professed Batmaniac, "like it didn't really satisfy my need to see Batman."

Still, it was enough to send fanboys and fangirls on a one-way trip to Krypton. Which got us to wondering.... could there really be a Krypton somewhere out there?

Who better to ask than Houston's very own Brainiac of astronomy, Dr. Carolyn Sumners at the Houston Museum of Natural Science.

"There could definitely be a Krypton," she says, "The universe is huge, and it is so enormous and there are so many stars. As many stars we know exist as grains of sand on the beaches of Earth."

You can see the wealth of planets closeup at the all-new Burke Baker Planetarium at the museum. It's the brightest and clearest look at the universe anywhere in the world.

"The Superman question is the hard one," Sumners continues. "What we don't know is how hard it is for life to develop because we only have data point one. And that's us!"

"I think anything is possible really," says Houstonian Maha Almaguer. His friend Peaches Murphy agrees, "There's so much left to explore out. It could be possible."

Amber Welch says other lifeforms are inevitable, "There's so many minor things even on our Earth that we don't even see. How can there not be something out there that we can't physically see?"

"It would totally sick if there was a planet Krypton," adds Arias, "and like, a Clark Kent that came down."

We'll have to see if Superman ever joins us. "But as far as planets like Krypton being there? No problem! I'm sure they are," assures Sumners. "Is there life there? Well, that's another question."

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