Catastrophic Medical Operations Center helped Houston hospitals avoid disaster

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HOUSTON -- During Harvey's catastrophic wrath, a catastrophic plan helped keep Houston's hospitals afloat.

Throughout the storm, within H-town's emergency center, a Catastrophic Medical Operations Center coordinated with all local hospitals and assisted with patients needing immediate special care.

"SETRAC is responsible for disaster preparedness in a 25 county area," Darrell Pile, CEO of Southeast Texas Regional Advisory Council, explained. "It includes 110 hospitals and probably 70 or so EMS agencies. We have an extraordinary communications system in place. we learn of needs electronically as well as through telephone calls."

And as you can imagine, the team was kept extremely busy during Harvey's visit, using disaster plans for every conceivable situation-- and then some!

"This storm was especially challenging," Pile added. "I suspect it challenged every plan we've ever written, and now we have some new chapters."

"We're estimating 1,500 patients required evacuation from facilities," he continued. "I can also tell you there are some extraordinary stories from facilities that stayed open throughout the storm."

One of those stories involved competitors sending supplies to the only medical center open in a heavily-flooded area.

Despite the wrath of Harvey on area hospitals, the Catastrophic Medical Operations Center has helped Houston's care centers bounce back fast...and strong!

"Today, 95 percent of our hospitals are back up and running, fully operational," Pile said.

Just goes to show, they don't call us 'Houston Strong' for nothing!