Advocates suggest saving net neutrality through local means

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HOUSTON - The decision to end net neutrality may have been made at the federal level, but advocates trying to bring it back from the dead are looking for local solutions.

“Our city and its leaders can fix this problem that the national government has created. We are here to offer a solution. Municipal internet,” says Elle Church with March for Science Houston.

“We believe in competition. We think that its good we just want to give Houstonians a fair shot being able to do it,” explained Daniel Cohen with Indivisible Houston.

And Houston’s City Council was legitimately interested in what they had to say, sounded like they'd had an earful on net neutrality lately.

“I've gotten a lot of calls about it, even family members have called me about it. I don't know what impact a council member can do about it but it does concern me that there may be somebody else controlling our access to the internet,” Councilman Michael Kubosh says.

“It's all because they claim that deregulation is a good thing, but I think we need to learn from our past that deregulation in the airline industry didn't go very well” commented Councilman Robert Gallegos.

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner already joined 65 other mayors in signing a letter of opposition to the decision made by the FCC.

After the City Council meeting, the groups headed to the office of Texas Senator Ted Cruz, hoping to gain similar attention for congressional appeals to save net neutrality.

“We'd like him to do the right thing. Which is to take congressional action that actually places protections in place,” Cohen says.

For these defenders of the world wide web, defeat for net neutrality is not an option.