Famous giant sinkholes in Winkler County getting bigger, according to SMU study

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WINK, Texas — Talk about a sinking feeling! Two massive sinkholes in Winkler County have researchers from Southern Methodist University very alarmed.

A study done by SMU finds the two giant crater-like sinkholes have expanded since first being discovered in 1980— and now new ones are forming!

"What are the most likely causes for the observations we have seen?" SMU professor Zhong Lu said.

If that weren't enough to worry about, geophysicists say they've discovered a 4,000 square-mile area of west Texas that's sinking and uplifting due to decades of drilling oil and gas wells in the area— along with salt water disposal wells and carbon dioxide injection.

The researchers say the ground movement they've detected is not normal.

But thanks to some new technology, maybe scientists can shed some light on what's happening here.

"NASA is developing a satellite called NiSAR," NASA program scientist Dr. Gerald Bawden said. "This type of radar satellite will be used to major detect and help understand why these processes are going on."

The Wink holes have practically become a tourist attraction labeled as 'Wink Sinks' since they're near the tiny town of Wink, Texas.

Before that, the only other big thing to come out of Wink was legendary singer Roy Orbison, whose famous for hits like "Pretty Woman" and "Crying."

Now locals really have something to cry over since their whole town could sink and get swallowed up into an abyss!

So, while that sinks in...you might want to be careful on the next road trip through Wink— and don't blink!

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