Abbott’s plan to ensure school safety in Texas includes hiring retired peace officers, more active shooter drills

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AUSTIN - Governor Greg Abbott  joined state and local leaders Wednesday to unveil his School and Firearm Safety Action Plan. The governor’s plan contains 40 recommendations and includes proposals that call for increasing law enforcement presence at schools, strengthening existing campus security programs, enhancing firearm safety, providing mental health evaluations that identify students at risk of harming others, and much more.

The announcement, which the Governor unveiled in Dallas and San Marcos, follows a series of roundtable discussions held last week during which the Governor spoke to, and received input from, victims, parents, educators, lawmakers, law enforcement and policy experts to help generate solutions that improve safety and security at Texas schools.

[Read: Governor Abbott’s School and Firearm Safety Action Plan]

“This plan is a starting point, not an ending place,” said Abbott. “It provides strategies that can be used before the next school year begins to keep our students safe when they return to school. This plan will make our schools safer and our communities safer.”

In addition, Abbott will also ask Texas Senate and House leaders to issue an interim charge to consider the merits of adopting a “red flag” law allowing law enforcement, a family member, school employee, or a district attorney to file a petition seeking the removal of firearms from a potentially dangerous person, only after legal due process is provided.

The recommendations identify nearly $110 million in total funding, including $70 million that is already or will soon be available to begin this important work. Additionally, the Governor has identified a specific need for $30 million that he will work with the Legislature to fund next session.

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