Austrians turn back train loads of migrants as EU officials confront worst migrant crisis since WWII

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VIENNA, AUSTRIA – Hope has turned into fear and frustration for as many as 2,000 migrants and refugees who just spent the last eight days in a train station in Budapest, Hungary.

Austrian security forces stopped their two trains, and sent back to Budapest any passenger who did not have a required European Union travel visa.

The passengers were a small percentage of the hundreds of thousands of people fleeing war and poverty in the Middle East and Africa.

This massive migration is the largest Europe has seen since World War II.

The overland route for migrants and refugees starts in Syria and moves into Turkey where they make their way to Greece, then Macedonia and Serbia, then into Hungary, and from there into other European Union nations.

European Union ministers are holding a special meeting in France to figure out what to do next.

Part of the plan calls for setting up registration hot spots in Greece and Italy, which have received more than 300,000 migrants this year.

The EU regulations known as the Dublin Provision require asylum-seekers stay in the first European country they get to while that government processes their applications.

Sometimes that wait can take weeks, long stays in overcrowded conditions that strain the resources of the host country.

And that is a formula for unrest and violence in a new land where they hoped to escape the unrest and violence in their home land.

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