U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals rules Texas voting ID law “discriminatory”

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NEW ORLEANS – The verdict is in regarding voter ID law in Texas.  Wednesday, the U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans ruled the law violates the Voting Rights Act, calling it “discriminatory” against minorities.  All this centers around the concern of voter fraud.

The 2011 law signed by then Republican governor Rick Perry, determines what type of identification can be accepted or rejected at Texas voting polls.

Right now, there are seven types of acceptable forms of photo ID, which are, a Texas driver’s license, free Texas Election Identification Certificate (EIC), Texas personal ID card, Texas conceal handgun license, U.S. military ID, a U.S. Citizenship Certificate, and a U.S. Passport.

On both sides of this law, Texas Republicans and Democrats will see some changes.

Chair of the Harris County Democratic Party Lane Lewis said, “Time and time again we’ve been telling the Republicans that this was not going to fly.  Now, one of the most conservative courts in the United States has voted, yes indeed that this is a discriminatory law, and we knew it.”

Republican Texas Governor Greg Abbott said in a statement the Fifth Circuit “wrongly concluded the law had a discriminatory effect.”

It’s no surprise Republican Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton didn’t stay quiet either.  Paxton said “it is unfortunate that this common-sense law, providing protections against fraud, was not upheld in its entirety.”

Now, the case goes back to the U.S District Court for the Southern District of Texas.  Makes you wonder how things will play out election day come this November.

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