Hold on to your wallet! Houston City Council approves largest rate hike for water services in decades

No Wait Weather

LATEST VIDEO

Tropics, Sahara dust, Tokyo weather forecast - Adam Krueger

Gov. Abbott bans vaccine requirements - Sharron Melton

Weekend forecast for July 31, August 1 - Adam Krueger

Doggie Daycare Sweepstakes

GRILL FORCAST 8 AM SHOW

STAR 7 DAY 8 AM SHOW

Morning sunrise time lapse, 3-day rain potential, local weather - Adam Krueger

Improving drought conditions - Carrigan Chauvin

Topo Chico shortage nationwide - Sharron Melton

NO WAIT WEATHER + TRAFFIC 7-Day forecast - Star Harvey

Mosquito weekend forecast - Carrigan Chauvin

Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee arrested - Sharron Melton

Texas Star Grill Shop weekend grilling forecast - Star Harvey

Weather headlines for July 30, 2021 - Adam Krueger

110° Highest heat index across the region - Carrigan Chauvin

NO WAIT WEATHER + TRAFFIC

NO WAIT WEATHER + TRAFFIC 6AM July 29, 2021

Tropics, August areas of origin - Adam Krueger

Bootleg fire footprint - Star Harvey

106° feels like temperatures today - Adam Krueger

HOUSTON (CW39) Starting September 1st your water and wastewater rates will increase. The Houston City Council approved the increase in Wednesday’s council meeting. The hike is to help improve infrastructure and meet federally required guidelines to address sanitary sewer overflows.

“Our water and wastewater system needs to be reliable, dependable and of good quality,” said Mayor Sylvester Turner. “I thank City Council for passing today’s measure and recognizing that water is an essential and critical infrastructure that must be addressed and improved. The importance of a resilient water and wastewater system became clear after Hurricane Harvey, Winter Storm Uri, and COVID-19. Having adequate and sound infrastructure will take us one step closer to building a more resilient Houston.”  

The water and wastewater rates will increase every year over the next five years and include the cost of making the first five years of investments agreed upon in the Consent Decree agreement with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) and the EPA. Because of the agreement, Houston is required to resolve sanitary sewer overflows and other wastewater violations by paying fines and making improvements to the wastewater system over the next 15 years.

Problems with Houston’s wastewater system began before Mayor Turner was elected. During negotiations with the EPA, the administration took a Houston-specific approach based on the city’s documented problems.

Houston’s wastewater system is one of the largest and most comprehensive in the nation, with approximately 6,000 miles of wastewater pipes, 382 lift stations to move waste due to Houston’s flat topography, and 39 wastewater treatment plants

To learn more about the water and wastewater rate increases, click here

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Popular

Countdown to end of hurricane season


Days

Hours

Minutes

Seconds

ZIP RECRUITER

Don't Miss